Dobby is a free elf!

Yes indeed, Dobby is a free elf.

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If Star Wars captured a generation’s imagination in the ’70s and ’80s, then Harry Potter must be the banner for this one.  Or it could be a shared love of Minecraft or Clash of Clans but I suppose we can leave that great debate to the pop culture talk shows of the future.  Our small people have embraced each of those three and they’re not afraid to send their wands through the x-ray detectors of international airport security.  Fortunately, no unforgivable spells have gone off at the wrong time. 

I might have said earlier that we weren’t in Europe just to track down Harry Potter sights.  And that’s mainly true…  But you’ve just gotta check out this other place we went.  Well, before we go there for all you Harry Potter fans, I’ll likely need to drag you through a dry, history lesson involving ancient peoples that no one’s heard of. 

OK, not really, welcome to the gorgeous grey stone of Edinbugh.  We love hearing of people’s different experiences and thoughts on the places we’re going.  I already knew Tina was cool but I don’t remember ever hearing that she was an exchange student to Edinburgh.  That must have been one incredible exchange!

The rain was falling, it wasn’t very warm and you can tell from Camille’s face here that she was really looking forward to getting into that castle…

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I love the Edinbugh castle and its imposing statues of William Wallace and Robert the Bruce.  The Latin phrase “Nemo me impune lacessit” over the gate translates to something along the lines of, “No one attacks me with impunity.” 

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On this rainy day, we keep the show moving as I visited the castle years ago and the kids are definitely hoping for inside activities. 

Part of our trip—we’ve realized lately—is a kind of literary tourism because we’re book nerds at heart.   We are missing our books!  We are burning up our Amazon accounts and I’ve even learned how to borrow books from the lending library via the Kindle unlimited feature.  

So, when we spotted a Writer’s Museum just off the Royal Mile we had to duck in.  Scotland’s favorite literary sons are honored here—Sir Walter Scott,

(c) National Galleries of Scotland; Supplied by The Public Catalogue Foundation

Robert Burns and Robert Louis Stevenson. 

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The stately Lady Stairs House, built in 1622, is a narrow building with a curling, stone staircase that grabs at your jacket as you climb. 

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We linger over Burns’ writing desk, Scott’s chessboard, rocking horse, dining table, and the printing press on which his Waverley novels were produced.  No pictures allowed inside so I grabbed a few from the internet.  

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Robert Burns claims the title of Scotland’s national poet and as such, his birthday is nearly a second national holiday.  At the annual Burns suppers, Scots gather to cut the haggis and enjoy Burns’ “Auld Lang Syne.” 

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Burns wrote in the 1700s and in the Scots language and some say gave the words to Scottish pride. 

“My love is like a red, red rose 

That’s newly sprung in June:

My love is like the melody

That’s sweetly played in tune.

How fair art thou, my bonnie lass,

So deep in love am I;

And I will love thee still, my dear,

Till all the seas gang dry.

Till all the seas gang dry, my dear,

And the rocks melt with the sun;

I will love thee still, my dear,

While the sands of life shall run.

And fare thee weel, my only love.

And fare thee weel awhile!

And I will come again, my love,

Though it were ten thousand mile.”

― Robert Burns

The Museum displays Stevenson’s riding boots and the ring given to him by a Samoan chief, engraved with the name ‘Tusitala’, meaning ‘teller of tales’.

I even jotted this one down in my notes…

“For my part, I travel not to go anywhere, but to go.  I travel for travel’s sake. The great affair is to move; to feel the needs and hitches of our life more nearly; to come down off this feather-bed of civilization, and find the globe granite underfoot and strewn with cutting flints”.   -Robert Louis Stevenson “Travels with a Donkey”

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Check out these wonderful shots of Edinburgh’s Royal Mile’s Georgian architecture.  I don’t really know what that means without phoning a friend at Wikipedia but I love it anyway.   The new town is over 250 years old and has earned UNSECO heritage status for historical and architectural reasons. 

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The innumerable alleys of the Royal Mile lead off to darker courtyards and streets between the tall stone blocks of homes.  Frequent English attacks led people to build near the castle, and each other for protection.  The “wynds” are narrow thoroughfares just about wide emugh for a horse and carriage.  A “close” is a pinched walkway that can be closed off with a door making it a private thoroughfare.  When you tie in this strange design with the seedy past of Edinburgh’s grave robbers you feel the “greyness” of this stone in the rain. 

A bit down the road and we chance upon Greyfriars Bobby.  This monument to the little dog has been loved on over the years and the tourists line up to snap a picture. 

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They made a book and a Disney movie about the little terrier that kept a 14-year graveside vigil nearby over his lost master.  Scholars recently have found evidence that this was a hoax perpetrated by businessmen to keep the interest and money flowing.  They would feed the dog in the cemetery to keep them there for passersby to gawk at.  I think we all prefer the story of the loyal, affectionate friend. 

Within yards, the National Museum of Scotland offers a roof and an incredible, neck-aching display of animals and skeletons. 

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We found more Lewis Chessmen here, adding to our enjoyment of them at the British Museum.  There are 11 here and 82 at the British museum.  The chessmen are considered Icelandic in origin and were discovered on the Outer Hebrides Islands.  So why so many at the British museum and so few in Scotland?

I don’t know the answer but we’re reminded of the words of our Highlands tour driver.  He told us how when tennis star Andy Murray loses a big match he’s Scottish but when he wins he’s British.  I would never have known that “British” author J.K. Rowling imagined and wrote all her books while living in Edinburgh.  She was one of the famous Scots who offered a visible voice to  one of the sides in the independence vote (she was for staying in the Union).  

Ah, that brings us to another great place to duck in for some warmth and a quick break—the Elephant House Cafe.  This is the place where Rowling would sit and write the Harry Potter novels.  Elephant posters and knickknacks abound and you have to wait for a table.  We get seated next to a lady writing determinedly at a choice table in the corner.  Another lady a few tables over is also concentrating on getting her thoughts down on paper.  Are they channeling Rowling or is this just a writers’ place?  The wooden floors creak pleasantly and the views of the backside of the Royal Mile buildings and the flag flying proudly over the castle are soothing, and beautiful. 

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Rowling news clippings and her involvement with the Elephant House cafe are displayed on the wall but you have to look a bit to find them.  Then both girls return from the bathroom with huge eyes, “There’s Harry Potter writing all over the bathroom walls!” 

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And they were not kidding—the mens’ walls were the same.  Fans’ pilgrimages here have burst out in love scrawled layer upon layer around the bathroom mirror, on the walls, and the ceiling.  “Weasley is our King”, “RIP” is written out to the lost characters, Deathly Hallows symbols all over the walls, and –more moving–are the poignant,  cathartic messages of people sharing what those books meant to them.  You feel like a voyeur into someone else’s life reading their innermost thoughts on the bathroom wall as you wash your hands at the sink.  You’re torn between reading more and fearing someone will walk in and find you studying the graffitied walls, in the men’s room—you weirdo. 

The trip planning rages on and we are tremendously blessed to have a roof over our heads, a pillow under them, and food in our bellies every day.  We have so much to be grateful for and know that God will never leave us or forsake us.  Going to Israel is on our trip planning radar now.   Anyone been to Israel and have any recommendations on taking in that amazing place as a family? 

11 thoughts on “Dobby is a free elf!”

  1. Heidi, God willing, we’ll be in Hawaii then. Love that your asking, any chance we can see you guys somewhere? Thank you for reading!

  2. Love it- your writing is lovely and makes me think happy thoughts. I know some peoples who worked at the Embassy in Isreal if you would like I could put you in touch?

    1. Thank you, I am really glad that it makes you think happy thoughts. Your phrase has been rattling around my head.

  3. Ahem. Sorry I’ve been such a closet fan because I’ve definitely followed your every post. I didn’t know your itinerary is still open. Since you’re on the same general latitude, can I repeat a previous offer? Are you up for Stockholm? I have access to a very affordable apartment in my building. We could make it work and there’s loads of awesome museums. Vasa! Skansen! Abba! Drop a line. Big hug, Teresa

    1. Teresa, I loved seeing you at the Getty a couple years back and was recently telling the kids about just one of the really cool jobs out there that you can do in the world (yours). I dig those world-class museums. We would LOVE to come see you in Stockholm but I apologize that we had to drop Scandinavia from the itinerary. We really wanted to get up into a fjord among many other things that that part of the world can offer. Plus, raw fish and some of the happiest people on the planet, right? Thank you, thank you, we would love to see you. But it might have to be in the good, ‘ol USA. However, employing Abba was not fair. Super Trooper forever!

  4. Thanks for the info on Kindle Loan Library!!!!! If you want to borrow any books on mine I guess I’ll have to email you a list….LOL!

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